GDPR Enforcement Tracker

This website contains a list and overview of fines and penalties which data protection authorities within the EU have imposed under the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR, DSGVO). Our aim is to keep this list as up-to-date as possible. Since not all fines are made public, this list can of course never be complete, which is why we appreciate any indication of further GDPR fines and penalties.

  • EEA-wide 55.955.871 EUR in fines
    11 EEA countries have already imposed fines under the GDPR. The total amount is 55.955.871 EUR: link
  • Lithuania: 61.500 EUR fine
    UAB MisterTango fined 61.500 EUR for violating Art. 5, Art. 32 GDPR and for not reporting a data breach (Art. 33 GDPR): link
  • Germany: 100 fines
    100 fines worth 483.500 EUR publicly known: link
  • Poland: 12.950 fine
    A sports association fined for publishing personal data referring to judges: link
CountryAuthorityDatePenaltyAgainstLegal basisSummaryInfos
PORTUGAL
PORTUGAL
Portuguese Data Protection Authority (CNPD)2018-07-17400,000HospitalArt. 5 (1) f) GDPR, Art. 32 GDPRInvestigation revealed that the hospital’s staff, psychologists, dietitians and other professionals had access to patient data through false profiles. The profile management system appeared deficient – the hospital had 985 registered doctor profiles while only having 296 doctors. Moreover, doctors had unrestricted access to all patient files, regardless of the doctor’s specialty.link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of Baden-Wuerttemberg2018-11-2120,000Social media networkArt. 32 (1) a) GDPRAfter a hacker attack in July personal data of approx. 330.000 users, including passwords and email addresses had been revealed.link
AUSTRIA
AUSTRIA
Austrian Data Protection Authority (dsb)2018-12-094,800Betting placeArt. 13 GDPRVideo surveillance was not sufficiently marked and a large part of the sidewalk of the facility was recorded. Surveillance of the public space in this way, i.e. on a large scale by private individuals, is not permitted.link
AUSTRIA
AUSTRIA
Austrian Data Protection Authority (dsb)Unknown-20181,800Kebab restaurantUnknownCCTV was unlawfully used. No further information available.link
AUSTRIA
AUSTRIA
Austrian Data Protection Authority (dsb)Unknown-2018UnknownRestaurantUnknownCCTV was unlawfully used. No further information available.link
AUSTRIA
AUSTRIA
Austrian Data Protection Authority (dsb)Unknown-2018300Private car ownerUnknownA Dashcam was unlawfully used. No further information available.link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of Hamburg2018-12-175,000Kolibri Image Regina und Dirk Maass GbRArt. 28 (3) GDPRPlease note: According to our information this fine has been withdrawn in the meantime. Kolibri Image had send a request to the Data Protection Authority of Hessen asking how to deal with a service provider who does not want to sign a processing agreement. After not answering Kolibri Image in more detail, the case was forwarded to the locally responsible Data Protection Authority of Hamburg. This Auhtority then fined Kolibri Image as controller for not having a processing agreement with the service provider. Kolibri Image has stated that they will challenge the decision in front of court since they are of the opinion that the service provider does not act as a processor.link link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of Baden-WuerttembergUnknown (not published)-201980,000UnknownUnknownThere is no further information available. This fine should not be mixed up with the one fine dealing with health data and which was also issued by the same authority, since the one dealing with health data was issued under the old German Data Protection Act. The existents of a second fine worth the same amount of money is only known due to a tweet of the Data Protection Commissioner of Baden-Wuerttemberg.link
FRANCE
FRANCE
French Data Protection Authority (CNIL)2019-01-2150,000,000Google Inc.Art. 13 GDPR, Art. 14 GDPR, Art. 6 GDPR, Art. 4 nr. 11 GDPR, Art. 5 GDPRThe fine was imposed on the basis of complaints from the Austrian organisation "None Of Your Business" and the French NGO "La Quadrature du Net". The complaints were filed on 25th and 28th of May 2018 - immediately after the DSGVO became applicable. The complaints concerned the creation of a Google account during the configuration of a mobile phone using the Android operating system. The CNIL imposed a fine of 50 million euros for lack of transparency (Art. 5 GDPR), insufficient information (Art. 13 / 14 GDPR) and lack of legal basis (Art. 6 GDPR). The obtained consents had not been given "specific" and not "unambigous" (Art. 4 nr. 11 GDPR).link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of Sachsen-Anhalt2019-02-052,000Private personArt. 6 GDPR, Art. 5 GDPRThe fine was impossed against a private person who sent several e-mails between July and September 2018, in which he used personal e-mail addresses visible to all recipients, from which each recipient could read countless other recipients. The man was accused of ten offences between mid-July and the end of July 2018. According to the authority's letter, between 131 and 153 personal mail addresses were identifiable in his mailing list.link
MALTA
MALTA
Data Protection Commissioner of Malta2019-02-185,000Lands AuthorityArt. 5 GDPR, Art. 32 GDPRAs a result of the lack of appropriate security measures on the Lands Authority website, over 10 gigabytes of personal data became easily accessible to the public via a simple google search. The majority of the leaked data contained highly-sensitive information and correspondence between individuals and the Authority itself. The Lands Authority chose not to appeal. In Malta, in the case of a breach by a public authority or body, the Data Protection Commissioner may impose an administrative fine of up to €25,000 for each violation and may additionally impose a daily fine of €25 for each day such violation persists.link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of HamburgUnknown-201820,000UnknownArt. 83 (4) a) GDPR, Art. 33 (1) GDPR, Art. 34 (1) GDPRLate notification of a data breach and failure to notify the data subjects.Page 134 of the activity report of the Data Protection Commissioner of Hamburg, accessible under link
HUNGARY
HUNGARY
Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and the Freedom of Information (NAIH)2019-02-081,560BankArt. 5 (1) d) GDPR - principle of accuracyA bank mistakenly sent SMS messages about a subject's credit card debt to the telephone number of another person. After receiving an incorrect telephone number from the client at the time of contracting, the bank did not comply with the data subject's request to erase the data and continued to send SMS message to the incorrect telephone number. The fine represents 0.0016% of the annual profit of the bank.link link
HUNGARY
HUNGARY
Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and the Freedom of Information (NAIH)2019-02-201,560Debt collectorArt. 5 (1) a) and c) GDPR - principles of transparency and data minimisationA data subject requested information about and erasure of the data processed, which the debt collector refused stating that it could not identify the subject. For identification purposes he requested place of birth, mother’s maiden name and further details from the data subject. After the controller succeeded to identify the data subjects he refused to comply with the deletion request, arguing he is legally obliged to retain backup copies according to the Accountancy Act and internal policies. Since he did not properly inform about these policies, the NAIH held the controller breached the principle of transparency. The fine constitutes 0.0025% of the annual profit of the controller.link link
POLAND
POLAND
Polisch National Personal Data Protection Office (UODO)2019-03-26219,538Private company working with data from publicly available sourcesArt. 14 GDPRThe fine concerned the proceedings related to the activity of a company which processed the data subjects’ data obtained from publicly available sources, inter alia from the Central Electronic Register and Information on Economic Activity, and processed the data for commercial purposes. The authority verified incompliance with the information obligation in relation to natural persons conducting business activity – entrepreneurs who are currently conducting such activity or have suspended it, as well as entrepreneurs who conducted such activity in the past. The controller fulfilled the information obligation by providing the information required under Art. 14 (1) – (3) of the GDPR only in relation to the persons whose e-mail addresses it had at its disposal. In case of the remaining persons the controller failed to comply with the information obligation – as it explained in the course of the proceedings – due to high operational costs. Therefore, it presented the information clause only on its website. According to the UODO this is not sufficient.link
HUNGARY
HUNGARY
Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and the Freedom of Information (NAIH)2018-12-183,200UnknownArt. 12 (4) GDPR, Art. 15 GDPR, Art. 18 (1) c) GDPR, Art. 13 GDPRThe fine was imposed for (i) not providing a data subject with CCTV recordings, (ii) not retaining recordings for further use by the data subject, and (iii) not informing the data subject about his right to lodge a complaint to the supervisory authority.link
HUNGARY
HUNGARY
Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and the Freedom of Information (NAIH)2019-02-283,200Mayor's Office of the city of KecdkemétArt. 5 (1) a) GDPR, Art. 6 GDPRThe fine was imposed on the Mayor’s Office of the city of Kecskemét for unlawful disclosure of the personal information of a whistleblower.NAIH imposed the fine after an employee of an organisation that it supervised reported a public interest complaint directly to it against his employer. After the organisation learned of the complaint, it requested details in order to investigate, and the local government accidentally revealed the complainant's name. The NAIH considered it an aggravating factor that as a result of the data breach, the organisation fired the person who made the report.link link
HUNGARY
HUNGARY
Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and the Freedom of Information (NAIH)2019-03-043,200Unnamed financial institutionArt. 5 (1) b) and c) GDPR, Art. 13 (3) GDPR, Art. 17 (1) GDPR, Art. 6 (4) GDRPThe fine was imposed in relation to a data subject's request for data correction and erasure. NAIH levied a fine against an unnamed financial institution for unlawfully rejecting a customer’s request to have his phone number erased after arguing that it was in the company's legitimate interest to process this data in order to enforce a debt claim against the customer. In its decision, the NAIH emphasised that the customer’s phone number is not necessary for the purpose of debt collection because the creditor can also communicate with the debtor by post. Consequently, keeping the phone number of the debtor was against the principles of data minimisation and purpose limitation. As per the law, the assessed fine was based on 0.025% of the company's annual net revenue.link link
DENMARK
DENMARK
DatatilsynetTbd-2019160,000Taxa 4x35Art. 5(1) e) GDPRThe Danish DPA reported the taxi company to the police and recommended a fine (of 1.2M DKK) for non-adherence to the data-minimization principle. While the company deleted the names of its passengers from all its records after two years, the deletion did not include the rest of the ride records (about 8,873,333 taxi trips). Hence, the company continued to hold onto individual's phone numbers.  Please note: Since Danish law does not provide for administrative fines as in the GDPR (unless it is an uncomplicated case and the accused person consented), fines will be imposed by courts.link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of SaarlandUnknown118UnknownArt. 6 GDPRIllegal disclosure of personal data relating to a third party.link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of HamburgUnknown-2018500UnknownUnknownUnknownlink
HUNGARY
HUNGARY
Hungarian National Authority for Data Protection and the Freedom of Information (NAIH)2019-04-0534,375Hugarian political partyArt. 33 (1) GDPR, Art. 33 (5) GDPR, Art. 34 (1) GDPRNAIH imposed a fine of HUF 11,000,000 (EUR 34,375) on an undisclosed Hungarian political party for failing to notify the NAIH and relevant individuals about a data breach, and failing to document the breach according to GDPR Article 33.5. As mandated by law, the fine was based on 4% of the party's annual turnover and 2.65 % of its anticipated turnover for the coming year. The breach was the result of a cyber attack by an anonymous hacker who accessed and disclosed information on the vulnerability of the organisation’s system – a database of more than 6,000 individuals – and the command used for the attack. The system was vulnerable to attack because of a redirection problem with the organisation's webpage. After the attacker published the command, even people with low IT knowledge were able to retrieve information from the database.link
BULGARIA
BULGARIA
Bulgarian Commission for Personal Data Protection (KZLD)2018-04-12500BankArt. 5 (1) b) GDPR, Art. 6 GDPRA fine of 1000 BGN (or roughly 500 EUR) was imposed on a bank for calling a client for the unresolved bills of his neighbor. This provoked the client to evoke his right to be forgotten. After not receiving any answer from the bank he filed another motion, for which the bank did take action in the statutory period. Nonetheless, the client filed a complaint to KZLD. The infringement for which the bank was fined was for the processing of the client’s personal data was not linked to his consumer credit agreement. Since the purpose for which the data were processed was different from that communicated at the time of conclusion of the contract, the bank had, in the point of view of KZLD, to request additional consent from its client.link link
BULGARIA
BULGARIA
Bulgarian Commission for Personal Data Protection (KZLD)2019-02-2627,100Telecommunication service providerArt. 6 GDPR, Art. 5 (1) a) GDPRRepeated registration of prepaid services without the knowledge and consent of the data subject Employees of the telecommunications provider have used personal data and registered the complainant with the company's prepaid service. The data subject had not signed the application and had not consented to the processing of his personal data for the stated purpose. There was also no other legal basis applicable. The signature of the application and the complainant own genuine application were not identical and the persons personal identification number was indicated, but the identity card number was not the complainants one.link
BULGARIA
BULGARIA
Bulgarian Commission for Personal Data Protection (KZLD)2019-01-17500BankArt.6 GDPR, Art. 5 (1) a) GDPRA bank gained personal data concernign a student wihtout a legal basis.link
BULGARIA
BULGARIA
Bulgarian Commission for Personal Data Protection (KZLD)2019-02-22500EmployerArt 5 (1) b) c) GDPR, Art. 12 GDPR, Art. 15 (1) (GDPR), Art. 15 (1) a), b), c), g) GDPR, Art. 15 (3) GDPRAn employee sent a request to his employer for access to personal data concerning him. The request was not answered in time and not in a complete way.link
ITALY
ITALY
Italian Data Protection Authority (Garante)2019-04-1750,000Italian political party Movimento 5 StelleArt. 32 GDPRA number of websites affiliated to the Italian political party Movimento 5 Stelle are run, by means of a data processor, through the platform named Rousseau. The platform had suffered a data breach during the summer 2017 that led the Italian data protection authority, the Garante, to require the implementation of a number of security measures, in addition to the obligation to update the privacy information notice in order to give additional transparency to the data processing activities performed.While the update of the privacy information notice was timely completed, the Italian data protection authority, raised its concerns as to the lack of implementation on the Rousseau platform of some of GDPR related security measures. It is worth it to mention that the proceeding initiated before May 2018, but the Italian data protection authority issued a fine under the GDPR since the Rousseau platform had not adopted security measures required by means of an order issued after the 25th of May 2018. Interestingly, the fine was not issued against the Movimento 5 Stelle that is the data controller of the platform, but against the Rousseau association that is the data processor.link link
CYPRUS
CYPRUS
Cyprian Data Protection CommissionerUnknown-20195,000State HospitalArt. 15 GDPRA patient complained to the Commissioner that the request for access to her medical file was not satisfied by the hospital because the dossier could not be identified/located by the controller. After investigating the case, an administrative fine of €5,000 was imposed on the hospital.link
CYPRUS
CYPRUS
Cyprian Data Protection CommissionerUnknown-201910,000NewspapaerArt. 6 GDPRThe publication of the newspaper, both in hard copy and in electronic form, allegedly involved inconvenience, unnecessary and unlawful detention of a citizen, and revealed the names and pictures of the two police investigators involved, as well as the photograph of a third police investigator. The Commissioner considered that the aim could be achieved by referring only to the initials of their name and/or their faces being blurred and/or publishing photographs drawn from a distant distance so that it was impossible to identify the persons, and these actions would not bring any change in the nature of the case.link
NORWAY
NORWAY
Norwegian Supervisory Authority (Datatilsynet)2019-03-XX170,000Bergen MunicipalityArt. 5 (1) f) GDPR, Art. 32 GDPRThe incident relates to computer files with usernames and passwords to over 35000 user accounts in the municipality’s computer system. The user accounts related to both pupils in the municipality’s primary schools, and to the employees of the same schools. Due to insufficient security measures, these files have been unprotected and openly accessible. The lack of security measures in the system made it possible for anyone to log in to the school’s various information systems, and thereby to access various categories of personal data relating to the pupils and employees of the schools. The fact that the security breach encompasses personal data to over 35 000 individuals, and that the majority of these are children, were considered to be aggravating factors. The municipality had also been warned several times, both by the authority and an internal whistleblower, that the data security was inadequate.link
GERMANY
GERMANY
Data Protection Authority of BerlinUnknown-201850,000N26Art. 6 GDPRThe fine was imposed against against a bank (according to a newspaper N26) that had processed "personal data of all former customers" without permission.The Bank has acknowledged that it had retained data relating to former customers in order to maintain a blacklist, a kind of warning file, so that it would not make a new account available to these persons. The bank initially justified this by stating that it was obliged under the German Banking Act to take security measures against customers suspected of money laundering. The Berlin supervisory authority judged this to be illegal. The authority argues that in order to prevent a new bank account from being opened, only those affected may be included in a comparison file who are actually suspected of money laundering or for whom there are other valid reasons for refusing a new bank account. The authority told a newspaper that the fine proceedings initiated against the bank had "not yet been legally concluded".Page 131 of the activity report of the Data Protection Commissioner of Berlin link link
AUSTRIA
AUSTRIA
Austrian Data Protection Authority (dsb)2018-12-202,200Private personArt. 5 (1) a) and c GDPR, Art. 6 (1) GDPR, Art. 13 GDPRThe fine was imposed against a private person who was using CCTV at his home. The video surveillance covered areas which are intended for the general use of the residents of the multi-party residential complex, namely: parking lots, sidewalks, courtyard, garden and access areas to the residential complex; in addition, the video surveillance covered garden areas of an adjacent property. The video surveillance subject of the proceedings is therefore not limited to areas which are under the exclusive power of control of the controller. Video surveillance is therefore not proportionate to the purpose and not limited to what is necessary. The video surveillance records the hallway of the house and films residents entering and leaving the surrounding apartments, thereby intervening in their highly personal areas of life without the consent to record their image data. The video surveillance was not properly indicated.link
POLAND
POLAND
Polisch National Personal Data Protection Office (UODO)2019-04-2512,950Sports associationArt. 6 GDPROne sports association published personal data referring to judges who were granted judicial licenses online. However, not only their names were provided, but also their exact addresses and PESEL numbers. Meanwhile, there is no legal basis for such a wide range of data on judges to be available on the Internet. By making them public, the administrator posed a potential risk of their unauthorized use, e.g. to impersonate them for the purpose of borrowing or other obligations. Although the association itself noticed its own error, as evidenced by the notification of a personal data protection breach to the President of the PDPA, the fact that attempts to remove it were ineffective determined the imposition of a penalty. When determining the amount of the fine (PLN 55,750.50), the President of UODO also took into account, among others, the duration of the infringement and the fact that it concerned a large group of persons (585 judges). It concluded that although the infringement was finally removed, it was of a serious nature.However, when imposing a penalty, the President of the Office of Competition and Consumer Protection also took into account mitigating circumstances, such as good cooperation between the controller and the supervisory authority or lack of evidence that damage had been caused to the persons whose data had been disclosed.link link
LITHUANIA
LITHUANIA
Lithuanian Data Protection Authority (VDAI)2019-05-1661,500Payment service provider UAB MisterTangoArt. 5 GDPR, Art. 32 GDPR, Art. 33 GDPRDuring an inspection, the Lithuanian Data Protection Supervisory Authority found that the controller processed more data than necessary to achieve the purposes for which he was a controller. In addition, it became known that from 09 - 10 July 2018 payment data were publicly available on the internet due to inadequate technical and organisational measures. 9,000 payments with 12 banks from different countries were affected. According to the supervisory authority, a data breach notification pursuant to Art. 33 DSGVO would have been necessary. The controller did not report the Data Breach.link